Dunsfold seek Designation for a Conservation Area

As previously mentioned, Dunsfold airfield has been the subject of a planning proposal and it has been brought to my attention that this has now gone through. Permission has being granted for the construction of some 1,800 homes. However, in order that some of the buildings can be saved, the Dunsfold Airfield History Society are seeking designation of the site as a conservation area.

In addition to this, Historic England are also looking at listing 10 of the buildings on the site, thus protecting them for future generations, and together, these moves may help save some of these historic features before it is too late.

You can help by registering support as soon as possible on the  on the Dunsfold Airfield History Society site at:
https://dunsfoldairfield.org/conservation-area/

Waverley Council have produced a map showing the extent of the site and the proposed conservation area.

P/O J. A. Philpott – RCAF Log Books

These books were kindly lent to me to read, they are the service records of P/O J. A. Philpott (1312948) of the R.C.A.F.

They are four in total and cover a period from September 1941 to November 1945. I shall read them and share some of the records later. These were kindly lent to me by his grandson to whom I am very grateful.

P/O J. A. Philpott - Log Books

P/O J. A. Philpott - Log Books

P/O J. A. Philpott - Log Books

P/O J. A. Philpott - Log Books

A Merry Christmas to all!

As the year draws to close and we spend time with our loved ones, I would like to just wish you all a very happy Christmas and a peaceful new year.

Another year has passed and looking back, we realise how quickly time passes. I am amazed how my own blog has gone from strength to strength, how my own writing has developed, from early posts that were merely a couple of paragraphs to more recent ones that are 2-3000 words long – a big change for me! I must admit I have a slight cringe when I read some of those early posts; as time has gone on I have started to revisit them (and the places they are about) and make some updates.

I would like to take time to thank each and every one of you who has read, commented and stayed with me during this journey, it has certainly been an experience I don’t want to forget.

This year, the blog surpassed 21,000 visitors and 50,000 views whilst not huge in comparison to some, it is certainly far more than I ever thought it would, and I appreciate each and every one.

Some notable posts/events you may have missed:

Hearbreak on Christmas Eve – the sad loss of Brigadier General  Frederick W. Castle (posted December 2015), whose awarding of the Medal of Honour, reflected the determination and personality of one of Eakers “Original Seven”. He chose to leave a safe position for a combat role, taking on the demoralised 94th, leading them into some of the Second World War’s most ferocious air battles.

The Last Word to Guy Gibson – also posted last year, a poignant word written in Gibson’s book.

In October 2015 we saw the end of an era, with the grounding of Avro Vulcan XH558. After an eight year reign as Queen of the skies, she finally bowed out after the three main technical companies that support her, withdrew their support. In her last flight on October 28th 2015, she completed a short 15 minute flight, the culmination of 228 flights and 346 hours flying time. A landmark in British Aviation history.

A number of British airfields were earmarked for development or planning applications, amongst them are the former: RAF Kings Cliffe, RAF Downham Market, RAF West Raynham, RAF Denethorpe and RAF Coltishall, with further applications affecting former RAF Dunsfold, RAF Bourn and RAF Wellesbourne Mountford. So what does the future hold for Britain’s airfields?

Early 2016, Aviation Trails was nominated for the Liebster Award by The Aviation Site and I was honoured to accept this award and in November it was nominated by Historypresent for a further writing accolade. Sadly this slipped off the list, but I would like to offer my sincere thanks for this very kind nomination.

With the total number of Trails standing at almost 40, I have visited what must be over 100 airfields; in addition a large number of memorials, and many great museums, and there are still many, many more of each to get to.

The interactive map has been useful to many readers outside of Britain hoping to find places where loved ones served, and a few people have contacted me which has hopefully helped trace some information thus filing in some gaps.

All in all it has been a marvellous year for AviationTrails, I wish to pass on my gratitude and thanks to each and every one of you.

So without further ado, a very Merry Christmas to everyone and a peaceful and safe New Year!

Andy

Is this the missing Stirling LJ850?

A recent report has identified what is believed to be the wreckage of Stirling LJ850 ‘QS-Y’ of 620 Squadron (RAF), that crashed whilst on a mission to drop paratroopers behind German lines.

Crew of Missing Stirling LJ850

The crew of LJ850 *1

The aircraft was part of a three ship formation and disappeared on the night of 17th / 18th June 1944, with a number of RAF personnel and the 1st SAS Regiment servicemen on board, – there were no survivors*2.

There has been considerable speculation about the fate of this aircraft and a number of theories as to what happened to it.

It was last heard from whilst over the English Channel, and initial thoughts were that it crashed into the sea. Other reports state it crashed into high ground on the run-in to the drop zone in the Morvan Mountains area near Les Valottes. A further report states it crashed 100 miles off course in the Savoy Hills, but there were never any reports by the German authorities at the time and no substantial wreckage has as yet been found.

Fragments form this particular wreckage may have been located a few miles inland of what was Omaha Beach, a possible location if LJ850 did come down shortly after its last transmission.

It is known that there were very few heavy bomber activities that night, and no bomber casualties were reported. Early indications are that the wreckage is of a Stirling bomber, so could this be the wreck of LJ850?

Before any investigations can proceed, a permit is required, but French officials are refusing to grant permission for any detailed search of the site, as the site is a “war grave”. They also quite rightly raise concerns over the conservation of the site, safety issues, and also jurisdictional considerations. So, for now, the story and final closure of LJ850 looks set to continue for some time yet.

620 Squadron was formed on 17th June 1943 at Chedburgh, and were initially involved in night bombing duties. In November 1943, they converted to airborne operations, dropping supplies, Paratroops and performing glider tug operations. Between March 18th 1944 and 18th October 1944, they operated from RAF Fairford, Gloucestershire, before moving to Great Dunmow and subsequently to the Middle East at the end of the war.

The crew of the Stirling were:

Wing Commander R.W. Crane  RAAF (s/n 413535) (Pilot)
Fgt. Sgt. F.N. Johnson  RAFVR (s/n 1395038) (Nav.)
W.O. II J.P. Clasper RCAF (s/n R159971) (B/A)
Sgt. D.W. Evans RAFVR (s/n 1407968) (Flt. Eng)
Flt. Sgt. G.W. Stopford RAFVR (s/n 657479) (W/O – A/G)
Flt. Sgt. B.J. Profit RCAF (s/n R189226)  (A/G)
Sgt. P. Wilding RAFVR (s/n 1345156) (Parachutist Dispatcher)*2.

The crew are represented on the Runnymede memorial.

Included on that flight when it crashed was Sgt. Reginald Wortley, (s/n 4863732) of the 1st Special Air Service Regiment. Wortley was one of the founder members of the SAS.

The names of the paratroops appear on the Bayeux Memorial.

The reported story can be found here.

*1 photo from CBC News website.

*In Dennis Williams’ book “Stirlings in Action with the Airborne Forces“, the crew list omits Wilding, the dispatcher, and lists 15 SAS troops killed on the night. Many thanks go to reader Darren Sladden for the further information and book recommendation, which I too recommend to anyone with an interest in this area of aviation. The Book was published by Pen and Sword Books, 2008, ISBN 184415648-6,

RAF Gransden Lodge aircraft revealed.

A recent article published by the Royal Canadian Air Force, tells the story of the fate and eventual discovery of, RCAF 405 “Vancouver” Sqn Halifax II, LQ-B.

LQ-B, s/n HR871, was based at RAF Gransden Lodge as part of 8 Group, Pathfinder Force from April 19th 1943 and was flown by Sgt. John Philips with his six crew members.

On the night in question, August 2/3 1943, they were part of a 740 strong force consisting of a mix of heavy and light bombers, who were despatched to Hamburg as part of the ongoing operation “Gomorrah”, to destroy Hamburg through blanket bombing. A combined operation by the RAF and USAAF would see continuous bombing both day and night from the end of July to the beginning of August whereupon they turned their attention to Nuremberg, Milan and then Peenemunde. In this short period some one hundred RAF aircraft were lost, many flown by Canadian, Australian and New Zealand crews, all fighting a war a very long way from home.

LQ-B set off with the other aircraft on the night of August 2nd and it was during this leg of the trip that they would encounter a terrific thunderstorm, in which lightning would strike the aircraft knocking out the two inboard engines, damaging a number of instruments and the radio.

With the aircraft difficult to control Philips made the decision to head north toward Sweden where the crew were eventually ordered to bail out. All the crew escaped the aircraft safely and were interned by the Swedish authorities until January 1944, when they were repatriated.

LQ-B went on to crash into waters just off shore of the Swedish coast where it has recently been discovered in 17 metres of water broken up and partially submerged in the silt. It is hoped to recover the aircraft in the near future.

During this same night 405 Sqn also lost the aircraft and crews of Halifaxes, LQ-E (HR849) and LQ-G (HR917) most of whom have no known grave.

Gransden Lodge, located on the Bedfordshire / Cambridgeshire border, can be seen in Trail 31, whilst the Royal Canadian Air force article can be found through this link.