January 1st 1945 – Loss of Mosquito PZ340

On the afternoon of January 1st 1945, Mosquito FB.VI #PZ340, ‘HB-Z’ took off from RAF West Raynham, according to the Operational Record Book it was assigned to a “high level bomber support” sortie over Heligoland, unusual as these Mosquitoes were not pressurised models. The pilot, F/O Ian George Walker (s/n: 156104) and navigator/wireless operator F/O. Joseph Ridley Watkins (s/n: 152875), had only just been brought together, F/O Watkins, from Wanstead in Essex, normally being based with 141 Squadron, but on attachment to 239 Squadron, when the flight took place.

On return, from the mission, the aircraft crashed near to Narford Hall, an Eighteenth Century stately home located a short distance to the north-east of RAF Marham in Norfolk. Whilst not confirmed, it is thought the crash was caused by an instrument failure, a crash that resulted in both airmen being killed.

Following the accident, F/O. Walker was returned to his home town and was buried in St. Michael’s Cemetery in Dumfries. F/O Watkins however, was buried locally, in nearby St. Andrew’s Church, Little Massingham not far from RAF Great Massingham. Both airmen were only 21 years of age.

The Mosquito, a Hatfield manufactured aircraft, was produced under contract 555/C.23(a), and was an aircraft designed for ‘intruder’ strike missions, it was the most commonly used variant of all Mosquitoes.  239 Squadron was in the process of replacing these examples with the MK. XXX before its disbandment on July 1st 1945.

Little Massingham St. Andrew's Church

F/O Watkins died on January 1st 1945 after the Mosquito he was in crashed near to RAF Marham, Norfolk. He rests in St. Andrew’s Church yard, Little Massingham.

 

January 1st 1945 – Loss of Mosquito PZ340

On the afternoon of January 1st 1945, Mosquito FB.VI #PZ340, ‘HB-Z’ took off from RAF West Raynham, according to the Operational Record Book it was assigned to a “high level bomber support” sortie over Heligoland, unusual as these Mosquitoes were not pressurised models. The pilot, F/O Ian George Walker (s/n: 156104) and navigator/wireless operator F/O. Joseph Ridley Watkins (s/n: 152875), had only just been brought together, F/O Watkins, from Wanstead in Essex, normally being based with 141 Squadron, but on attachment to 239 Squadron, when the flight took place.

On return, from the mission, the aircraft crashed near to Narford Hall, an Eighteenth Century stately home located a short distance to the north-east of RAF Marham in Norfolk. Whilst not confirmed, it is thought the crash was caused by an instrument failure, a crash that resulted in both airmen being killed.

Following the accident, F/O. Walker was returned to his home town and was buried in St. Michael’s Cemetery in Dumfries. F/O Watkins however, was buried locally, in nearby St. Andrew’s Church, Little Massingham not far from RAF Great Massingham. Both airmen were only 21 years of age.

The Mosquito, a Hatfield manufactured aircraft, was produced under contract 555/C.23(a), and was an aircraft designed for ‘intruder’ strike missions, it was the most commonly used variant of all Mosquitoes.  239 Squadron was in the process of replacing these examples with the MK. XXX before its disbandment on July 1st 1945.

Little Massingham St. Andrew's Church

F/O Watkins died on January 1st 1945 after the Mosquito he was in crashed near to RAF Marham, Norfolk. He rests in St. Andrew’s Church yard, Little Massingham.

 

Leslie Howard Pilot Officer 77sqn. RAF(VR) RAF Elvington

As a teacher, I often try to squeeze in a little bit of modern history. I feel it’s important that the younger generations know and understand what sacrifices were made during both the First and Second World Wars (not to mention the many others) so that they realise lives are lost and that war is not a game of ‘Call Of Duty’.

To my surprise one of the girls brought in some papers and explained how it was a relation of hers on her mother’s side, but she knew nothing about him. The gauntlet was thrown, eager to know more, I took copies of the relevant documents and brought them home.

After some considerable searching I came up with some interesting facts about this man.

His name was Leslie Howard (s/n: 168652), he was originally a policeman, and came from the Sheffield area (Birklands Road). He was married to ‘Gladys’ and on joining the RAF was posted to 77 Squadron who were based Elvington at the time of his death. He was a sergeant and received training on Wellington bombers. After promotion, he became and Pilot Officer and flew Halifax (V) bombers from Elvington with 77 Sqn, RAF(VR).

On the night of 20th /21st December 1943, he was on a mission to bomb Frankfurt. With him on board were: Sgt. E Dickman, F/sgt. C. Quine (DFM), F/Sgt. J. Waterston, Sgt. N.H.C. Short, Sgt. W.C. Wight and Sgt. A.P.H. Restarick. His Halifax, S/N LL121, “KN-G” was attacked by what is believed to be by either JU88 or B110 of 8./NJG3 night fighter squadron, piloted by, again not confirmed, Oblt. Paul Zorner, from Hintermellingen, near Frankfurt.

The aircraft was severely damaged and crashed. Both P.O. Howard and Sgt. E.W.Dickman were killed, whilst the others survived being taken prisoners of war.

Sgt. Dickman was buried in Runnymeade, whilst P.O. Howard was buried in the cemetery at Hintermellingen. His remains are now in the Hanover War Cemetery, block 16, row A, number 18.

I informed the father of the young child who was more than interested as they knew little of him. He told me that the family on the mother’s side, still resided in the Yorkshire area and were visiting in the next week or two. He would pass this information on.

I shall continue digging, to find more and confirm the details I’ve already found, but you get a real sense of achievement and satisfaction to know that a little bit of history has been uncovered for this family.

If you know of, or have any further information about this operation or crews, I would love to hear from you.

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Do you recognise anyone in these photos? Particularly the bottom left.

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The telegram sent to Mrs Howard.

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Leslie Howard’s grave is 16.A.18 to the top of the diagram (created by the War Graves Commision).