September 8th 1943 – Tragedy at RAF Mepal.

On the night of September 8/9th 1943,  a force of 257 aircraft comprising 119 Wellingtons, 112 Stirlings, 16 Mosquitoes and 10 Halifaxes took off from various bases around the U.K. to bomb the Nazi gun positions at Boulogne. Included in this force were aircraft from the RAF’s Operational Training Units, and for the first time of the war, five B-17s flown by US aircrews of the USAAF’s 422nd BS, 305th BG at Grafton Underwood. This was the first of eight such missions to test the feasibility of the USAAF carrying out night operations over Europe.  After the remaining seven missions, in which the squadron had dropped 68 tons of bombs, the idea was scrapped, the concept considered ‘uneconomical’ although the aircraft themselves proved to be more than capable of the operations.

The Gun battery targeted, was the emplacement that housed the Germans’ long-range guns, and the target wold be marked by Oboe Mosquitoes. With good weather and clear visibility, navigation was excellent, allowing the main force to successfully drop their bombs in the target area causing several huge explosions. However, not many fires were seen burning and the mission was not recorded as a success. Reports subsequently showed that the emplacement was undamaged due to both inaccurate marking by Pathfinders, and bombing by the main force. However, as both anti-aircraft fire and night fighter activity were light, no aircraft were lost during the flight making it a rather an uneventful night.

However, the mission was not all plain sailing, and whilst all crews returned, the night was marred by some very tragic events.

Three Stirlings were to take off from their various bases that night: at 21:00 hrs from Chedburgh, Stirling MK. III, EF136, piloted by F/S. R. Bunce of 620 Sqn; at 21:30, another Stirling MK.III, from 75 Sqn at RAF Mepal, BK809 ‘JN-T*1‘ piloted by F/O I.R.Menzies of the RNZAF; and lastly at 21:58 also from Chedburgh, Stirling MK. I, R9288 ‘BU-Q’ piloted by N.J. Tutt  of 214 Sqn.  Unfortunately all three aircraft were to suffer the same and uncanny fate, swinging violently on take off. The first EF136 crashed almost immediately, the second BK809 struck a fuel bowser, and the third R9288 ended up in the bomb dump. Miraculously in both the Chedburgh incidents there were no casualties at all, all fourteen crew men surviving what must have been one of their luckiest escapes of the war! The same cannot be said for the second though.

Stirling BK809 was part of a seventeen strong force of 75 Sqn aircraft. Each aircraft was carrying its full load made up of 1,000lb and 500lb bombs. As the Stirling was running along the runway, it swung violently, striking a fuel bowser which sent it careering into houses bordering the edge of the airfield.

One of the occupants of one of the houses, Mr. P. Smith, saw the aircraft approaching and ran into the street to warn others to get clear. As the aircraft struck the rear of the houses, it burst into flames causing some of the bombs to detonate. This brought considerable rubble down on the occupants of the second house, Mr and Mrs John Randall.

Mrs Randall managed to get out, her legs injured, whereupon she was met by a local fireman, Mr. A.E. Kirby of the National Fire Service. Mr. Kirby went on to help search in the wreckage of the house until his attempts were thwarted by another explosion. His body, along with that of Mr. Randall, was found the next day.

Two other people were also killed that night trying to provide assistance, those being F/Sgt Peter Gerald Dobson, RNZAF and Section Officer Joan Marjorie Easton WAAF. F/Sgt. Dobson was later mentioned in despatches. Three members of the crew lost their lives as a result of the accident, F/O. Menzies and F/O. N. Gale both died in the actual crash whilst Sgt. A. Mellor died later from injuries sustained in the accident.

A number of others were injured in the crash and one further member of the squadron, Cpl Terence Henry King B.E.M, was awarded the British Empire Medal “for his bravery that night in giving assistance“.

The mission on the night of September 8/9th 1943 will not go down as one of the most remarkable, even though  it was unique in many respects, but it will be remembered for the sad loss of crews, serving officers and civilians alike in what was a very tragic and sad event.

The crew of Stirling BK809 were:

F/O. Ian Robert Menzies RNZAF NZ415002. (Pilot).
P/O. Derek Albert Arthur Cordery RAFVR 136360. (Nav).
P/O. Norman Hathway Gale RAFVR 849986. (B/A).
Sgt. Ralph Herbert Barker RNZAF NZ417189. (W/O).
Sgt. Albert Leslie Mellor RAFVR 943914. (Flt. Eng).
Sgt. Bullivant G RAFVR 1395379. (Upp. G)
Sgt. Stewart Donald Muir RNZAF NZ416967. (R/G).

RAF Mepal was visited in Trail 11.

Sources and Further Reading.

*1 Chorley, 1996 “Bomber Command Losses 1943” notes this aircraft as AA-T.

Chorley, W.R., “Bomber Command Losses – 1943“, Midland Counties, (1996)

Middlebrook M., & Everitt C., “The Bomber Command War Diaries”  Midland Publishing, (1996)

Further details of this accident, the crews and those involved can be found on the 75 (NZ) Sqn blog. This includes the gravestones of those killed and a newspaper report of the event.

My thanks also go to Neil Bright (Twitter handle @Blitz_Detective) for the initial  information.

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12 thoughts on “September 8th 1943 – Tragedy at RAF Mepal.

  1. What an awful tale…although extremely well told as always. The Stirling, for whatever reason put forward was an awful aircraft and took so many lives. The idea also comes into my mind of why the top brass at the base had allowed any “houses bordering the edge of the airfield”? Asking for trouble surely?….although I can imagine that a lot of people wouldn’t have wanted to leave their homes. I wonder what kind of alternatives they were offered?

    Liked by 1 person

    • That I don’t know John. I’d imagine those outside the boundary weren’t offered any alternative, 6 feet outside being no different to 6 miles. Certainly for this to happen was tragic and perhaps with more forethought could have been avoided.

      Like

  2. My thoughts are with the crews that lost their lives. One point about logistics Andy. Do you have any idea about the decision-making process that led to the RAF bombing by night and the USAAF by day? I should imagine that from a logistical point of view it may have made sense to separate the two forces to avoid ‘blue on blue’ incidents, especially with the escorting fighters, but I have no idea why one force was selected to perform night missions and the other day missions.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think it basically boils down to the RAF suffering unsustainable losses during the day and switching to night, whereas the Americans thought they could do it with fewer losses because aircraft, like the B17, were so well heavily defended. I suspect there was an element of arrogance about it. The logistics of separating them does make a lot of sense anyway regardless, creating a continuation of bombardment that would demoralise any city’s population and stretch emergency services to the absolute limit. Thanks Rich.

      Liked by 2 people

      • It also had a lot to do with the fact that by 1941 the RAF were well and truly committed to night ops while the Americans were already committed to daylight operations before Pearl Harbour. It made sense therefore that that’s how they went to war. The fact that the USAAF were experimenting with night operations shows just how dangerous daylight ops were without adequate fighter escort. Night fighters and basic Bf110s would be launched against the American bomber streams and wait for their escorts to run out of fuel. Then they would attack using their longer ranged and harder hitting 20mm cannons to wear down the bombers on the fringes of the formation where there was less cooperative cover. It wasn’t until the P-51D and the change of tactics the USAAF fighters adopted by going hunting for German fighters rather than being stuck to the bombers as well as shooting up bases that the Luftwaffe was effectively silenced allowing the RAF and USAAF to attack a single target around the clock.

        Liked by 1 person

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